Angelface

I saw your angelface, I heard your voice.at morning song, your bright soprano and I felt beneath your robe, your youth that kindled flames in me.

From you I crave for this. This ache.

For this I’ll give to you my life, eternity, my words so promise me, my love, come when vespers have been sung, (and bring no book) 

For this, one day, we’ll give to idleness.with hunger of our hands, our breath, our life beyond. 

But tonight for this we’ll burn, fingers probing, finding flesh, pushing, tasting mucus and being wicked, play. 

For this my curse and blessing. Please come sing, debase me, hurt me. please my love, for this. I’m not your teacher, but your greedy student.

For this will be our little secret, this staining hidden under bedsheets. 

How can they call a master’s love like this exploitation?

The monk in the cornfield
Rembrandt

Ingrid hosts Prosery today at dVerse, and the lines we are to embed in our story (which in my case is quite sordid) are:

And bring no book, for this one day
We’ll give to idlene
ss

From Wordsworth’s ‘Lines Written at a small distance from my House…‘ which is included in the collection Lyrical Ballads,

January 17, 2021.

17 responses to “Angelface

  1. OH, those amorous monks, what shall we do with them? This is great prose, which could be rewritten as poetry; clever.

  2. ………….Stunned…how much more original can one get…..so full, stylistically, linguistically, emotionally…there are many elements here, sinister may be one, but there is politically as well, even sensually for some..wonderful..

  3. Björn, I think it’s safe to say that nobody else will take this prompt in a similar direction… this is so unexpected, given the line. Wow. And… I agree with Ingrid about it also being a bit sinister!


    David

  4. Oh dear….at first I thought…how romantic, how sensual. And then it becomes apparent — this is naked power used over another. Evil indeed…and you capture it so well.

  5. Wicked-
    And that monk in the cornfield. Gosh, the examples… Love how you gave so much humanity to Wordsworth’s lovely words in this fantastic prosery. Thanks so much.

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