Sowing tomatoes elsewhere

We filled the belly of our spaceship
with the final soil our mother carried
and to ticks of Geiger counters we
slipped into the upper decks of our ark
and left the gravity of radioactive death
behind. We raised the standard starsails
entered proper coordinates for that projected
dwelling science had proposed:
A planet, almost blue, a perfect pebble
as the sphere we turned to dust;
unspoiled it waited for the child you
carried yet inside your womb; you said:
“We should spend our time to teach
her to be kind, to not wage war, and
if she ever reach the second earth
to bury us with shame”, I smiled and took
your hand, we gazed at stars, knowing well
that views would stay the same until the end
and we would move through parsecs
knowing not if our daughter ever would
sow tomatoes in a garden over there.

Tomato Plant by Pablo Picasso

A second narrative poem for my prompt at dVerse, also for Sherry’s prompt at toads on what we are doing to mother earth.

September 27, 2018

23 responses to “Sowing tomatoes elsewhere

  1. WOW! I LOVE this poem, which tells a more hopeful story than one might expect……….I hope she will get to plant those tomatoes, and begin a peaceful race of kind people. I grieve the sphere we are treating so badly, that they are leaving behind. I so loved reading this poem, Bjorn. Thanks so much!

  2. How prolific of you, sir–serving up both Gothic and Sci Fi. Where do you find the time? This piece had the feel of SILENT RUNNING. Unfortunately, the futurists agree, it’s man’s own nature that is his biggest obstacle.

  3. yes we should be so shamed with what we do to mother earth, maybe another species will educate us. I am reminded of Kurt Vonnegut’s dreams on a distant planet that waged love and understanding not war and strife, a good story for young people to appreciate what we have and be kinder to earth

  4. I love this sci-fi tale of rebirth and hope, Bjorn, especially the phrases: belly of our spaceship’ and ‘raised the standard starsails’, and the description of ‘A planet, almost blue, a perfect pebble’. I love that they are carrying a new life in the womb inside the spaceship.The ending is ambiguous and poignant.

  5. “We should spend our time to teach
    her to be kind, to not wage war, and
    if she ever reach the second earth
    to bury us with shame”,……………every line from there onward is matchless!

  6. This is hands down the best poem I have read in a long time. It says everything a poem of our time should say. Such a strong narrative basis for your vision; the direct speech is so poignant, and the final line hooks into the emotional value of the whole piece.

  7. It is sad to read all these poets verses and to think that the future of the planet is on their minds but not those who are slowly killing it off with the mindless stupidity of a spoilt child banging his head against the wall.

  8. A species so innovative and with such an exploratory spirit, but alas! Everything they touch turns to dust and they cannot help but destroy everything they touch despite their advanced technology, even their sons and daughters, even themselves. My favorite part here was how your husband took your wife’s hand as they are wont to do, to offer a touch of comfort in the tender time of pregnancy,
    “I smiled and took
    your hand, we gazed at stars, knowing well
    that views would stay the same until the end…”

  9. It’s funny how many read it as a story of hope. And others as inevitable doom. I agree with Glenn: “It’s man’s own nature that is his biggest obstacle.” You can’t outrun it, even to the speed of light.

I try to reciprocate all comments. If you want me to visit a particular post, please direct me directly to that post.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.