The aged librarian’s advice

Treat every book with care,
between its pages rests:
a universe
a sacred crypt
a piece of you and everyone
a place to meet or be alone.

Enter every book with awe,
remember how
you used to bring to bed a flashlight
with your book.

Fear books that makes it hard to sleep,
filled with nightmares and excitements,
but fear even more
the boring books
that turn your brain to tapioca.

Bring books as company,
as friends and foes,
confide, confront your books
but don’t forget to put them down
and talk to the people that you meet.

Be book yourself, and fill your days
with sense, with syllables and sentences
with pages, paragraphs, be bold
and live (or dream),
your own adventures.

And when you cease to breathe
know well
that every book can not be read.

Man, Sitting, Reading a Book by Vincent van Gogh

Mish hosts dVerse today and wants to write a poem on good advice. I thought it would be a good moment to listen to what the aged librarian might say. Join us when the bar opens at 3 PM EST.
Also linking up to the Open Platform at toads.

36 responses to “The aged librarian’s advice

  1. Thank you Librarian – Nice to be reminded about books in all their dimensions: “remember how
    you used to bring to bed a flashlight
    with your book.”

    Yes and could not wait to get to bed to read – now I listen to books in bed and give my ageing eyes a rest

  2. *cries* You had to remind me of one of my most awful realizations made in my 30’s – I will never, ever read everything I want to read. *cries again* Time is too short to read anything that turns you brain to tapioca. I will take that reminder to heart.

    As a giant bookworm, I have mad love for this piece.

  3. I love books, even books I haven’t read, I love to feel them, hold them, smell them…but best of all is to read them….

  4. Love this series ~ I will resist with books turning my brain into tapioca. This part is full of wisdom :

    Be book yourself, and fill your days
    with sense, with syllables and sentences
    with pages, paragraphs, be bold
    and live (or dream),
    your own adventures.

  5. I especially love the two last stanzas – for surely, Be Book – well, yes, isn’t this exactly it? Write your own damn script – and remember, to look people in the eye? For surely, all stories are written there, between the spines and flesh, yet, we can never truly know the whole story, of the book, or of another.

    Wonderful reading and advice from the aged Librarian.

  6. Another fine poem in the epic saga (much like my own) of the aged Librarian. Nice feel to this one. I would take things further and say,
    “Be your own Movie”; grin.

  7. I like your “Aged Librarian” series. It’s good to hear
    of him again. Books can be precious friends.

  8. Be the book! Read between the lines. I love the imagery of books as friends, foes and confidantes. Your aged librarian series fills my head with pages of your wisdom and bookshelves full of your beautiful words. Every line describing how our lives intertwine with the life force of books, is sublime!

  9. kaykuala

    but don’t forget to put them down
    and talk to the people that you meet.

    One cannot possibly be immersed in its pages to turn a blind eye to the world. Life has its balancing to survive in! Very true!

    Hank

  10. Hooray! The aged librarian is back! And I’m off to the library in the next few hours for Bounce and Rhyme. Very good advice, Bjorn!

  11. HA! I love your admonition to fear books that turn your brain into tapioca. 🙂 Humor aside, I love your tribute to the power of the written word.

  12. This is wonderful. I like the variety of advice from one source, you left nothing out, and the progression of the poem leading to the analogy of ourselves and books….brilliant!

  13. Oh I’ve missed the aged librarian. Such sage advice he gives here. My mother always said “If you enjoy reading, you’ll always have a friend and you’ll never be bored.” I smiled at the tapioca reference😊

  14. I’m sending this to my friend who’s a librarian – I think your work should hang in the lobby of all libraries as a reminder.
    I particularly enjoyed the lines, ‘but fear even more/the boring books/that turn your brain to tapioca.’

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