Your icicles


“Let’s mend the bridges – make it as before”,
it’s said, it’s out and seconds sway; your eyes
suspicious; silence spilled upon the floor
in whisper as of ghosts, a thought disguised
if just your gaze would rest: your head could nod
affirm or smile or even hand me lies.
But minutes pass — I iterate my frauds,
the vice not even promises can hide
and in your eyes the icicles won’t thaw.
Two halves — a ship, a shore our rope untied
I know it’s time to leave, to raise the masts
a scripted end when ink will kill my pride.
But as I grab the pen you look aghast
we seek direction and the sky is vast.

Georgian woman on a couch by Niko Pirosmani

Georgian woman on a couch by Niko Pirosmani


Today Karin want’s us to ponder halves at toads, and that fitted quite well to my narrative of my sonnet corona (that I have decided to make a double). Hope this fits the prompt.
Previous sonnets: Bluebells, The tear of tears, Before the monsters, When we had built a nest and “Let’s mend the bridges“.

9 sonnets to go.

April 19, 2015

29 responses to “Your icicles

  1. Hey Bjorn–cool sonnet, and cool pic, and you definitely describe two halves of a couple breaking apart here–the ins and outs and second-guessing. Thanks much for making my prompt part of your series. K.

  2. The trick to a memorable sonnet is a strong movement in the latter part. Your tenth line really nailed it for me:

    Two halves — a ship, a shore our rope untied

  3. A very gripping read, so sad when the icicles wont thaw. I felt “oh no” when I hit the time to raise the mast, and hope at the last minute with the vastness of the sky. I am enjoying this series of sonnets, a form you excel in.

  4. This sonnet progression is obviously honing and perfect your skill with the form, and this one is to me, the best yet, from “…t’s said, it’s out and seconds sway; your eyes/suspicious; silence spilled upon the floor/” to the final sonorous, even chilling end-couplet that yet holds out a desperate sort of transfixed hope. Really, really fine writing here, Bjorn.

  5. i don’t know much about sonnets and poetry in general, but enjoy reading your creative pieces…the thought of mending a failing relationship with one who has lost the fire of love…aches the soul deeply.

  6. “Two halves — a ship, a shore our rope untied
    I know it’s time to leave, to raise the masts
    a scripted end when ink will kill my pride”

    This portion is so succinct, Bjorn.

    Great opening with the bridge as well.

  7. Oh, the end of this really got me, Björn! Beautiful and as always completely blown away by your mastery of form!

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  9. Those bridges are hard to mend, Bjorn. Your line, “Two halves — a ship, a shore our rope untied,” tells of an outgrowing of one beyond the other, that they are no longer equal halves.
    ..
    ..

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  11. This is really well done, Bjorn. I love your closing lines, especially. I wonder if we will all have our pride killed by ink. That’s really brilliant.

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  15. “in your eyes the icicles won’t thaw” Phew! What a line. It brought to mind the idiom “staring daggers” – in this case, icicle daggers.

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