Still his mother

Blenda knocked once and waited.
From behind the door she could hear people moving, but nobody opened.

She knocked again; sharper this time.
The door opened… Blenda recognized the woman.

“Hello, little one,” Hilda smiled, caressing the little boy appearing by her side.
“I want to see my Robert.”

Hilda smoothed her skirt.

“But why… he’s out-of-wedlock-born.”
“I’m still his mother.”

“No longer here… I sent him to my sister… “
“Where?”
“He died… pertussis.”

Blenda’s eyes welled up.

“Where is he buried? “

Hilda thought of ashes she had mixed with human excrement.

“He’s buried at my sister’s… far far away. “

© Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Hilda Nilsson was a serial killer in Sweden who took care of children born out of wedlock for money and killed them. She could go on for quite some time before a mother wanted to see her little son. The story is terrible in so many ways, and tells of a world that is so different from ours. It was actually quite common that unwanted children were killed through malnutrition and neglect, but Hilda murdered them directly. She was the last woman to be sentenced to death in Sweden, but hanged herself before she was to be pardoned to life in prison.

Friday Fictioneers is a wonderful group of bloggers who write 100 word stories each week to the same picture. Rochelle hosts and set the example, and this week we use her picture.



October 10, 2018

70 responses to “Still his mother

  1. the fiction was dreary and a downer and it was great the way you made the historical connection to Hilda. What a terrible person she was – and in a way – the building in the photo feels like it could fit such a grim occurrence

  2. Yikes! A chilling piece of history you provided here, Björn. You gave a glimpse into the horror of it in your piece, and I appreciated the explanation following that provided more context. It certainly explained why Hilda’s response was so fishy.

  3. This is a real diabolical story. How can someone kill children born out of wedlock? Glad she is dead.

  4. What an awful tale, made more so by it being based on fact. Awful, but well told. There is still a bit of a stigma for being born out of wedlock, but thankfully nothing like this any more (at least we hope not!).

  5. I really like the way you create the scene, and the dialogue, starting as ‘normal’ and becoming horrendous with the line : ‘she thought of the ashes mixed with human excrement’. Thanks for the historical info- I knew nothing about this woman.

    • Part of it is the time when children had no value born out of wedlock, no contraceptives and people poor enough trying to earn money in whichever way they could… but not every baby farm was as bad as this.

  6. The back story is equally fascinating. A cold blooded killer indeed, I like how you make her talk in a casual tone bordering indifference.

  7. I once saw the novelist who wrote A Clockwork Orange (Anthony Burgess) interviewed on television and he said words to the effect that some people are just evil. There is no cure, no mentoring, so psychiatric intervention that could change them. Tragically the woman in your piece was not the only one. In my opinion, her suicide was the psychopath’s last act of control and superiority.

  8. I appreciate your story, a tale that makes the reader feel and think. Over the years, we have worked with and tried to help “unwanted” children. No matter her upbringing, Hilda is not excused from the horrors she inflicted on innocent ones and I’m so glad she was caught eventually. There are parts of the world where Hilda’s still exist, sadly.

    Well-written as always.

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