A day for Schopenhauer

When summer hesitates
like it does today
he bends with wind
and willow close to water
with his weight morosed.
Benched he sits alone
dropping breadcrumbs for the geese

He tries to read.
This is a day for Schopenhauer
a day for being ridiculed
for being later right.
He watches as the girls pass by
he wonders why
his life has turned the same as rain
to everything and nothing
when summer hesitates.

german-philosopher-arthur-schopenhauer-1896.jpg!Large

German Philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer by Félix Vallotton

Linked to Open Platform at toads. Summer can be a bit depressive.

2017-07-04

22 responses to “A day for Schopenhauer

  1. A0lso, a time of growth and understanding, Bjorn, but tempered, with the knowledge that death is not far behind.

  2. When is life like rain? When it satisfies thirst, wets the seeds, fills the basin, changes the mood, or rolls down our cheeks like tears? We pray for rain, we dance for rain, we imagine it coming to us over the mountains…we cannot live without it.

  3. “When summer hesitates” what a beautiful opening line, and the ending “his life has turned the same as rain
    to everything and nothing
    when summer hesitates.”
    Beautiful. Beautiful, beautiful poetry. 🙂

  4. Ah Schopenhauer’s keen eye for human foibles…do we dare to take such a view of ourselves in the modern age without shrivelling a bit?
    How well you have captured the scene, in way that allows the reader to see the world through the eyes of your protagonist, and shiver at the thought of life being the equivalent of rain, so prone to a washing away. What a poem!

  5. I love that image of Schopenhaure:
    ‘Benched he sits alone
    dropping breadcrumbs for the geese’. Maybe he should visit the aged librarian – I’m sure they have a lot in common.

  6. I love the image of Schopenhaure: “he bends with wind and willow close to water with his weight morosed. Benched he sits alone dropping breadcrumbs for the geese.” Beautifully penned.

  7. I do not know enough about Schopenhauer to fully appreciate all the aspects of the poem, though you do not make that a pre-condition! A really interesting poem, I love the idea of summer hesitating and morose used as a verb; and that sense of being ridiculed but later proved right–really it is very amusing as the guy seems quite confident of how all this will go. It is very well done, Bjorn. k.

  8. Often when I don’t finish reading something or only partially understand what I have read, I feel as though, it is as nothing – that it was better never to have read what I read at all, than to arrive between all and nothing (if you get my drift), I always think, if only I had the will I could have completed it. For some reason this poem made me think of that feeling. Perhaps it was the lines:

    ‘his life has turned the same as rain
    to everything and nothing
    when summer hesitates.’

    An interesting piece … as was my goggle of Schopenhauer ~ oops, there’s that feeling, again ~ Smiles

  9. “(W)eight morosed” is a wonderful bit of phrasing. I don’t normally equate Schopenhauer with July 4th, but I’m beginning to believe that’s my fault.

  10. The bit of melancholia, the uncertainty… is so vivid in the last questioning lines. The imagery of rain that almost is but isn’t leaves the chest feeling tight, wondering…

  11. “Show-pen hour.” That’s when you’re supposed to have been writing and are expected to show your work, but you’ve not been able; the flow’s not coming so far. So you’re going to read instead, even though you may be missing your deadline with a publisher or something.

    I love this part:

    “This is a day for Schopenhauer
    a day for being ridiculed
    for being later right.”

    The pain and loneliness of being the only one who knows you’re right in whatever you’re thinking or doing; later, maybe after death, the world will appreciate your genius. But right now, they maybe think you’re crazy, or just wrong.

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