Bridging with patience

The previous day we had hardly left the cabin. Ceaselessly the rain had beaten roof and windows, clouds had licked the soil while gusts of wind had shaken walls and doors. When morning came the rain had ceased, but rivulets had grown to rivers. The sound of rushing water filled the valley, and on the map we sought a path with bridges. cause in the mountains, any well prepared plan is just an option.

During the day we had to change plans many times. One bridge was gone since long, another led us only halfway, and we could not ford the mountain streams we wanted. When finally at night we pitched our tent we had learned that also waiting can replace a bridge. The morning after we could cross the streams that were unpassable the previous evening. Many plans were changed that day but afterwards we remember more how water can be bridged with patience.

after the rain
ptarmigan family
seeking catkins

Crossing a bridge in Norwegian Mountains

Crossing a bridge in Norwegian Mountains

Today Grace inspires us to write haibun about bridges at dVerse. Join us at 3PM EST.

October 31, 2016

25 responses to “Bridging with patience

  1. I love the sound of rushing water. We once lived in a house that had a stream running near it. When it rained, it turned into a torrent. I loved the way nature ignored our meagre efforts to control it.

  2. I appreciate the lessons from your journey. Some roads can be unpassable, including the bridge, after a strong rain However with patience, there will be new roads and trails to follow. Enjoyed the personal share Bjorn ~

  3. Very wise, and a good reminder to all of us who rush about, getting over excited about things. I love the detail of this haibun, and that fantastic picture. Did you take it?

  4. The sense I get is that despite the water rushing along, hiking cannot be rushed and being patient allows time to bridge the gaps. I like the picture too.

  5. I really enjoyed that first paragraph, Björn, particularly the picture you build up of the wet and windy weather: ‘clouds had licked the soil while gusts of wind had shaken walls and doors’. I felt like I was their with you and your wife. I also enjoyed the hikers’ philosophy in ‘waiting can replace a bridge. The morning after we could cross the streams that were unpassable the previous evening’. From now on I will think of you as Björn Ptramigan – do you remember the TV programme The Partridge Family?

  6. That sounds like the kind of experience that is better in the retelling than while actually living through it! I would have been terrified. But I love the gentle philosophy of waiting that you have made out of it.

  7. You certainly did the prompt! LOL! I love the ‘clouds licking the soil’ and the overall descriptiveness of this piece. And the issue of patience…which is so often forgotten in our rushed days.

    And the haiku. Lovely.

  8. …waiting can replace a bridge..I like that thought. I have done it many times myself. Some of make the mistake of going in the fast lane and miss so much.

  9. Pingback: Bridging with patience – Priyanka Naik·

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