The weight of snow

His words were footsteps made
   in wet snow,
imprints cold and heavy
hesitant but rushed as crossing roads
in winter, careful not to slip.
Through puckered lips his breath —
was a bourbon hearse,
   hefty with the lard of age,
      still he smirked at death…

Today Lilian hosts at dVerse poetics and gives us a number of graffiti images to use. The sad clown seemed like a safe bet.
—-
November 14, 2017

31 responses to “The weight of snow

  1. Wow! Just WOW! Setting this in the weight of snow….and these words “a bourbon hearse,
    hefty with the lard of age,
    still he smirked at death…”
    A powerful response to this piece of street art. I thought this image was haunting and your words have verified that.

  2. I love the title, Bjorn, which is so expressive, and then I read the opening lines and melted – you know I don’t like clowns but this one made me sad. I found these lines effective and banana skin clown-like:
    ‘hesitant but rushed as crossing roads
    in winter, careful not to slip’
    The sadness poured out of the lines:
    ‘Through puckered lips his breath —
    was a bourbon hearse’,

  3. A bourbon hearse – that is a loaded line there. (No pun intended) But it tells a whole story in just a few words. I wouldnt mind hearing more of his story though. He is probably not much different than the rest of us – one decision different. That is why I dont mind hanging with the homeless, cause they aint no different than us – but just one decision.

  4. “Through puckered lips his breath —
    was a bourbon hearse” … Holy cats; that is fantastic! The ending as well.

  5. The bourbon hearse hefty with the lard of death-genius. It has a flavor from The Stranger by Albert Camus, only better.

  6. “still he smirked at death…” This line is so inspiring that it gave me light to look at this picture in another way. Brilliant, as always, Bjorn.

  7. Pingback: At least the president gets the joke – erbiage·

  8. Your words created a strong image which I say, can very well stand on its own apart from the image that was the poem’s inspiration.

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