Fog in wig and gown

In wig and gown

Muddiest —
that leaden headed fog,
too thick,
groping,
pestilent,
holds this heaven and earth.

Softly tripping on slippery
pretence
its owlish drawl from padded
madhouse, dead
in every churchyard,
its threadbare dress
exhausts the brain and
breaks the heart..

That is not honorable —
this murky afternoon (in wig and gown)
suits no crumb
squeezed dry.

waterloo-bridge-in-the-fog-1901.jpg!Large

Waterloo Bridge In The Fog by Claude Monet

Today Victoria hosts at dVerse, and we do Blackout poetry. Find a poem in any text you have. I invite you to guess which book it comes from.

October 26, 2017

37 responses to “Fog in wig and gown

  1. Muddiest —
    that leaden headed fog,
    too thick,
    groping,
    pestilent,
    This is definitely pea-soup fog. We lived in the Isle of Man for a few years and if you had to go over the mountain (Snaefell) there was a warning sign if Manannan’s cloak (the fog) was down. It was quicker to go over the mountain so sometimes you would risk it, only to find 10 minutes in that it was a grave mistake and that the concentration required to get through the groping pestilence did fair exhaust the brain.
    Wonderful poem.

  2. I like this line that emerged from this challenge “Softly tripping on slippery pretence.”

  3. I like this, falls somewhere between Poe & Conan-Doyle for me. It builds suspense & has a palpable sense of place. Blackout poems, creation from another’s words, is a strong challenge. I, too, used fog in my piece. I like your line /its owl drawl from padded madhouse/.

  4. I will not guess, since I know–but the atmosphere you create fits so well–both the novel and the eerie thoughts of this time of the year. After living a couple of years in Brittany, I thought I would be happy never to see fog again, but now I so enjoy its moods and the beauty you can see when ascending above it.

  5. I also know which book and am impressed with the outcome, Bjorn. My favourite lines:
    ‘Softly tripping on slippery
    pretence
    its owlish drawl from padded
    madhouse…’

  6. Such a good write – it seems to capture the foggy essence of the original text – thanks for posting the original blacked out page too – the line ‘exhausts the brain and breaks the heart’ – is a ripper – both in the original tale and in your verse.

  7. I’m afraid I can’t hazzard a guess as to the book – but what an interesting exercise. I thought that: ‘in every churchyard, its threadbare dress exhausts the brain and breaks the heart.’
    was fantastic. I’ve never known, the somewhat flukish fall of words to come together, quite so thrillingly. I have tried similar exercises and I’ve never been quite so lucky. Smiles

  8. Björn, I’m so glad I didn’t miss this amazing work of yours! You may have gathered words from Dickens but you’ve rolled those words around and made something completely of ‘you’. I admire your ability to create depth with amazing word choices. Can’t stop reading this!

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