Mostly I am dreaming

Shackled to existence,
you grab my space-suit collar,
plead with tripled eyes ajar:

“Name a star from me”,
you say; I touch your
hair and folds of nape.

I point out constellations,
mumbling names, but all are
taken; claimed.

“Why’s infinity so cramped?
Why are galaxies too far away?
Why are alien minds so much like mine?
Why?” — you vitrioled.

But I have obligations elsewhere,
new frontiers to explore.
My orders are no longer sealed.

My ship, defying gravity
its hull veneered in white,
is hoisted into voids.

I see your lifeform fading
under seasick desert suns.

Soon I fall in muted trance,
survival potion pumping
through my hungry veins.

I dream in technicolor, limboed
in the timespace just between
your shackled being
and my spaceship prison.

My mission is exploring
but mostly I am dreaming.

Space Eve by Salvador Dali

Space Eve by Salvador Dali

Today I host Open Link at dVerse, bring any one poem you want to share and join the fun, bar opens at 3PM EST.

June 9, 2016

42 responses to “Mostly I am dreaming

  1. ‘Shackled to existance’ is a perfect opening line for this poem. It FEELS like Dali as it moves from stanza to stanza. One of the most unique experiences is visiting the Dali Museum near Tampa, Florida. Even the park benches outside are Dali. The place just messes with your mind! Wonderful choice of art 🙂

  2. Love this — it is intimate and yet I felt the expansive, endless space in it as well. What inspiration can’t the stars give us? Keep flying your ship — exploring while you are dreaming – or dreaming while exploring! I was in Tampa earlier this year and wish I’d made time to visit the Dali museum. Thanks for sharing.

  3. Wow, a Sci-Fi transcendent existential ditty that transports us into the cosmos; no mean feat, brother–enjoyed it a lot.

  4. I love the last two lines so much. Years ago, a friend, for my birthday, gave me a star – a tiny little dot in the cosmos one cannot see but on the star map, the almost invisible dot is circled and named: Toni895374
    It cost (then) $15 – a princely sum! But I love how this poem does indeed transcend limitations. Truly wonderful.

  5. This is a really lovely, poetic, beautiful, and sad poem all at once, Bjorn. It’s so contemplative, and I like that great thought that the universe is somehow filling up. We’re almost too big for it! Very nice one.

  6. I love love love love love this poem so much!

    “Why’s infinity so cramped?
    Why are galaxies too far away?
    Why are alien minds so much like mine?
    Why?” — you vitrioled.

    I relate so much with these lines…you sir have nailed this poem in the tooth. Bravo! and surrealism acclaim. 🙂

  7. Oh, wonderful poem. I love anything to do with stars and space – I once worked for the European Space Agency and have been using an app on my Kindle to track Tim Peake on the ISS. Yes, to have a star named after you is perfect. The problem is, we all have obligations elsewhere and often new frontiers to explore. We forget to appreciate the planet we are on.

  8. My favourite stanza is:
    “I see your lifeform fading
    under seasick desert suns.”
    Just something so unique, about this image, you leave the reader with, Bjorn.

  9. This is fanciful and wondrous. I enjoyed your trying to name the infinite constellations only to come up with the same old ideas. Very smart.

  10. I specially love this part : “Name a star from me”,
    I admire the exploration of space, but more so of the imaginative mind ~ Keep on dreaming ~

  11. Yesterday I was reading that the purposes of art and poetry are to explore and expand our understanding. This poem strikes me as an exquisite exemplar of these purposes!

  12. Mostly, I am dreaming and what a glorious dream. I have candle holder shaped like a star. I was given this at last year’s summer solstice celebration. We each held a star of our own and each candle was lit off the person next to you. A continuous circle of light.

  13. Simple as ABC (Asimov, Bradbury and Clark — the holy trinity of space), this poem enters the pantheon of speculative writers! Great work — now come home!

  14. My mission is exploring
    but mostly I am dreaming.

    Exploring implies the inquisitive mind. And this can certainly be preceded with dreams on what to accomplish

    Hank

  15. Love the marriage of outer and inner space here. Maybe mind is Aeneas–ever sailing on–and the unconscious is Dido, waving in the fading distance of the last island we dream.

  16. You tell a melancholic tale with this one, Bjorn! I am in awe of the closing lines. The poem reminded me as well of Elton John’s song “Rocket man” (but in my preference performed by Maynard J. Keenan of Tool/APC/Puscifer)

  17. “Why ‘s infinity so cramped?” LOVE that!

    “My mission is exploring
    but mostly I am dreaming.”

    Oh I know this very well.

  18. Afloat in space, I am following every word with you. Galaxies so far away — surely we are too ethnocentric to think we are the only living ones.

  19. The infinities of space have always intrigued me and I do not believe we are the only lifeform to exist in it, that said I am a bit wary of meeting them…
    Great write Björn.
    Anna :o]

  20. Nobody mentioned the limboed condition so I will. It shows the mood of the poem clearly. I’m chaffing at the idea of the cramped galaxy and yet being nowhere really.

  21. This was lovely! All the images the poem brought to my mind – I felt like I was dreaming through space too. Thank you for sharing this with us!

    (Reality seems so drab to me now!)

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